Teaching Creationism Is ‘Child Abuse,’ Says Prominent Physicist


Teaching Creationism Is ‘Child Abuse,’ Says Prominent Physicist Lawrence Krauss (VIDEO)
By Deborah Montesano

images-1

Big Think, the online knowledge forum, released a video on Tuesday of theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss speaking on the idea of teaching creationism. In it, Krauss asserts that the notion of creationism defies reality and teaching it to children is tantamount to child abuse. The video is in reaction to Senator Marco Rubio who, in December, declared in an interview with GQ that he didn’t know how old the earth is. In Rubio’s words:

“I’m not a scientist, man. I can tell you what recorded history says, I can tell you what the Bible says, but I think that’s a dispute amongst theologians… I think parents should be able to teach their kids what their faith says, what science says. Whether the Earth was created in 7 days, or 7 actual eras, I’m not sure we’ll ever be able to answer that. It’s one of the great mysteries.”

Wrong, says Krauss. Evolution is accepted reality, the basis for all biological sciences. For someone like Rubio, who is presumably both intelligent and educated, to take the stand that anything goes in education–that it’s okay for any belief to be taught regardless of reality–is a terrible error. In the following video, Krauss says:

“Allowing the notion that the Earth is 6,000 years old to be promulgated in schools is like teaching kids that the distance across the United States is 17 feet. That’s how big an error it is… The purpose of education is not to validate ignorance but to overcome it… To overcome a situation where a United States Senator can speak such manifest nonsense with impunity is vitally important to the healthy future of our society.”

 

Here’s the video:

Krauss isn’t the first person to insist that teaching creationism is a form of child abuse. Various atheist and rationalist groups have maintained the same thing. But people of faith, like Anglican priest and theologian David Jennings, of Leichester Cathedral, have taken that stand also. Last fall, when asked whether creationism should be taught in the schools, Jennings said in an open forum:

“There are some people who believe the earth is actually flat… But do we teach that, do we actually suggest that to young people?… Whatever people want to believe in the privacy of their own home, in the privacy of whatever religion they practice, they’re free to do that. But to teach young people things that we know are not true is tantamount to an abuse of young people.”

Last August, Bill Nye the Science Guy weighed in on the subject, also for Big Think:

“Denial of evolution is unique to the United States…I say to the grown-ups, If you want to deny evolution and live in your world that’s completely inconsistent with everything we’ve observed in the universe, that’s fine. But don’t make your kids do it because we need them. We need scientifically literate voters and taxpayers for the future…we need engineers that can build stuff, solve problems.”

Here’s the video:

All of these men underline the point that we Americans are not only unique in our denial of science, but also in the degree to which that denial holds back our young people. As a society, we’re jeopardizing both our future and theirs. We battle over religious ideology–which seems to lurk behind every issue these days–rather than uniting to educate our young and insure that they maintain an edge when it comes to innovation and leadership in the world.

Is Queensland Australia’s Dumbest State? Creeping Creationism in Queensland Schools!


Creationism in Queensland schools

 

Image:  In some state schools in Queensland creationism appears to be creeping onto the science curriculum. (Getty Images)

The issue of religion being taught in Australian state public schools is a controversial one. In primary schools around the country, the State Education Acts allow for Religious Instruction, or Religious Education, to be taught for an hour a week by representatives of the church—who do not need a qualification in education to do so.

These classes are meant to be an ‘opt in’ scenario.

But, it appears that in some state schools in Queensland Creationism—the belief that the Christian God created the earth in a different time scale to that agreed upon by evolutionary science—is entering the science curriculum.

http://snd.sc/Y4h1ou

Catholic Fanatic Rick Santorum Wants to Ban Science from Schools


Rick Santorum: ‘Science Should Get Out of Politics’
Rick Santorum is infamous as one of the most determined religious fanatics in US politics, an activist who believes Christian [he’s Catholic] creationism should be taught to all American children in science classes, and a persistent Republican advocate for injecting fundamentalist Christian religion into the political process at every level.

Speaking at the University of Northern Iowa today, Santorum uncorked a real howler, with no apparent recognition of its intense irony. Santorum said the problem with American politics is too much science.

Discussing controversial classroom subjects such as evolution and global warming, Santorum said he has suggested that “science should get out of politics” and he is opposed to teaching that provides a “politically correct perspective.”

Topped off with a helping of homophobic hatred masked as religious victimhood:

Regarding education and the legalization of same-sex marriage, Santorum said he is concerned that schools will be forced to teach that all forms of sexual activity are normal, healthy and good behavior. He said that would be “counter to the belief structure of many people who have students attending those schools” and they would have little grounds to object.

 

Conspiracy Theory Addiction and Christian Fundamentalism


Rational people don’t subscribe to conspiracy theories.

Conspiracy adherents share a flawed worldview with religious adherents, one derived from flawed thinking and anti-scientific methods.

Conspiracism mirrors  Creationism or its ridiculously pretentious euphemism, Intelligent Design.

These ideologies invariably begin with a false premise and then amass entirely selective factoids said adherents believe will support their crackpot hypothesis, but their false premises inevitably only lead to false conclusions.

Their methods are alien to civilised notions of the pursuit truth and of course, a complete disregard for scientific principles and methodology.

Religious fundamentalism embraces conspiracism and is historically the seminal source of modern conspiracism.

baphomet_$_35

Here’s first hand accounts and insights, tripping through the millieu of conspircaism and Christian fundamentalism:- Christian Fundamentalism’s Easy Compatibility with Conspiracy Theories

I began my journey through Christian Fundamentalism in about 1975. In short order, even at my good church, Bensalem Baptist Church, I was introduced to the idea of a conspiracy of Satanists from then reigning conspiracy cuckoo, Johnny Todd, who barked at us from the pulpit that the Satanists, the Illuminati, the pope and–oh, I can’t recall who else–probably Henry Kissinger, were all running the world from one huge Satanic secret society.

More here:- Conspiracy Theory Addiction and Christian Fundamentalism

Though Shermer has given us a list of great cognitive fallacies typical of belief in conspiracy theories (posted in yesterday’s blog), he does not give us a reason that some people (or cultures) persistently flock to conspiracy theories, urban legends, etc., as a pillar of their world outlook.