SCIENCE NEWS

 

  • RING AROUND THE WORLD In September, a third ring appeared between the two known Van Allen radiation belts that girdle the Earth thousands of miles above. more >>
    Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Laboratory/Univ. of Colorado Boulder Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics

 

  • VIRAL CULPRIT A new type of coronavirus, pictured in a false-color micrograph, has sickened 13 people, seven of whom have died. Scientists are scrambling to better understand how the virus works and how it’s transmitted. more

 

  • LAUGHING AT GRAVITY An Asian weaver ant (Oecophylla smaragdina) can dangle a weight more than 100 times heavier than itself without losing its grip on the surface above it. more >>
    © Thomas Endlein

 

  • An infant born with HIV has cleared her body of the virus with the help of three medications started shortly after birth, scientists reported March 3 at the Conference on Retroviral and Opportunistic Infections in Atlanta. 03.04.13 | more >>

  • Having HIV may boost a man’s risk of heart attack, a study of more than 82,000 veterans suggests. 03.04.13 | more >>

  • Pregnant women who took an omega-3 fatty acid supplement had bigger babies 03.04.13 | more >>

  • Honeybees may be busy, but they may not be efficient: Native pollinators could help farms worldwide produce bigger harvests. 03.01.13 | more >>

  • Mammalian sperm just don’t go with the flow. 03.01.13 | more >>

  • Meteorites smacking into the early Earth could have created warm, watery environments favorable to primordial life. A new study of an impact crater in Finland suggests that such hydrothermal activity could have lasted up to 1.6 million years — at least 10 times longer than theory suggested, providing plenty of time for life to emerge and spread. 03.01.13 | more >>

  • High above Earth’s surface float two rings of energetic charged particles, and for about four weeks in September, they were joined by a third. The temporary ring may have formed in response to a solar shock wave that passed by Earth, researchers report online February 28 in Science. 02.28.13 | more >>

  • Children with dyslexia may read better after playing action video games that stress mayhem, not literacy, a contested study suggests. 02.28.13 | more >>

  • The Vulcan mind meld is no longer the stuff of science fiction. Scientists have electronically linked the brains of pairs of rats, enabling one to apparently share information with the other. And unlike the Vulcan technique, there’s no need for close contact: Using an Internet connection, one rat in Brazil sent signals to the brain of a rat in North Carolina. 02.28.13 | more >>

  • If someone shouts “look behind you,” tadpoles in Michael Levin’s laboratory may be ready. The tadpoles can see out of eyes growing from their tails, even though the organs aren’t directly wired to the animals’ brains, Levin and Douglas Blackiston, both of Tufts University in Medford, Mass., report online February 27 in the Journal of Experimental Biology. 02.28.13 | more >>

  • WASHINGTON — A deadly new virus has scientists scrambling to learn more about it and figure out whether the virus will become a pandemic or remain a limited threat. 02.27.13 | more >>

  • SAN ANTONIO — For people with a dairy allergy, gulping down a glass of milk is unthinkable. But many patients came away with that ability after a months-long program of exposure to increasing amounts of milk, researchers from Israel reported February 24 at a meeting of the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology. 02.27.13 | more >>

  • An Asian weaver ant boasts not one but two superpowers: Its extreme sticking power comes with extraordinarily quick emergency grip protection, researchers have discovered. 02.27.13 | more >>

  • Highlights from the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, San Antonio, February 22-26, 2013 02.26.13 | more >>

  • WASHINGTON — Discerning one lipstick from the next can be tough for consumers but it’s even harder for scientists. Now forensics researchers have found a quick method to tell apart individual lipsticks, no matter the color or brand. The approach could help investigators analyze evidence in cases in which a smear of lipstick on glass, paper or a piece of clothing becomes important. 02.26.13 | more >>

  • Losing zzz’s disrupts daily rhythms at biochemical level 02.25.13 | more >>

  • Mouse brain cells scamper close to eternal life: They can actually outlive their bodies. Mouse neurons transplanted into rat brains lived as long as the rats did, surviving twice as long as the mouse’s average life span, researchers report online February 25 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 02.25.13 | more >>

  • Soil phosphorus levels drive tree species’ different growth patterns 02.25.13 | more >>

  • SAN ANTONIO — Bad actors in air pollution may contribute to asthma and allergy by subverting protective cells in the body that tone down immune reactions, researchers report. The pollution components also seem to rev up overactive immune warriors — already linked to allergies — that need no such prompting. 02.25.13 | more >>

  • A stalagmite’s past may help reveal Earth’s future. By studying Siberian cave formations as old as 500,000 years, researchers have found that even moderate climate warming may set off significant thawing of permafrost. 02.25.13 | more >>

  • Like the sun, insulin levels rise and fall in a daily rhythm. Disrupting that cycle may contribute to obesity and diabetes, a new study suggests. 02.22.13 | more >>

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