• MALIGNANT GROWTH A glioblastoma tumor (green) formed in a mouse’s brain after scientists tweaked two cancer-related genes in a small number of brain cells called astrocytes (red). more >>
    Image courtesy of Eric Bushong
Latest News
  • New work suggests that a hormone that makes the body think it’s starving could prolong life about as long as severely cutting calories does but without the denial. 10.19.12 | more >>

  • New work could help explain why a deadly type of brain cancer recurs easily even after surgery, radiation and chemotherapy have apparently banished it. Fully developed brain cells, not just stem cells, may take on new identities to evade therapy and come back later, the study suggests. 10.18.12 | more >>

  • Keeping an eye on geological faults can be useful even long after they convulse in a great earthquake. By watching a Turkish fault after a deadly 1999 quake, geologists have pieced together a detailed picture of creeping fault movement after a big shake-up. 10.18.12 | more >>

  • Blood pressure decreases with apnea treatment, vitamins fail to protect against colorectal cancer, and more news from this week’s medical journals 10.18.12 | more >>

  • NEW ORLEANS — Fearful associations can be knocked back during sleep, research in mice shows. After receiving an injection of a drug, a nasty link between a scent and a painful foot shock faded as the mice slumbered. 10.18.12 | more >>

  • Willpower alone doesn’t explain why some children forgo a marshmallow in hand for the prospect of getting two gooey treats later. Kids’ beliefs about the reliability of the people around them, such as the trustworthiness of an experimenter, can dramatically shape their willingness to wait for a sweeter payoff, a new study finds. 10.17.12 | more >>

  • Astronomers searching for Earthlike worlds need look no further than Alpha Centauri, the stellar system next door. 10.16.12 | more >>

  • Carbon dioxide has been vilified for decades as a driver of global warming. A new study finds signs that CO2, exhaled in every breath, can exert an equally worrisome threat — impaired cognition — in nearly every energy-efficient classroom, meeting hall or office space. 10.16.12 | more >>

  • Despite what the fashion magazines tell you, 40 isn’t the new 30. Seventy is. 10.15.12 | more >>

  • The oft-maligned teenage brain is getting some reputation rehab. When offered the incentive of a modest reward in a recent experiment, teens took more time than adults to make a thoughtful, reasoned decision. 10.15.12 | more >>

  • One of the most exciting physics discoveries in recent years may not be a discovery after all. Reports of “supersolidity,” in which solid helium flows through itself without friction, may turn out be something far more ordinary: the everyday stiffening of a material. 10.12.12 | more >>

  • A meteorite that streaked to Earth in a blazing fireball over the Moroccan desert is one of the freshest samples of the Red Planet’s surface and atmosphere that scientists have ever seen. 10.11.12 | more >>

  • Men with high blood levels of lycopene — the compound that makes tomatoes red — are about half as likely to have a stroke as those low on lycopene, researchers in Finland report October 9 in Neurology. 10.11.12 | more >>

  • Genetically engineered embryonic stem cells in the lab turn on a developmental program similar to the one thyroid glands go through in the body, Francesco Antonica of the Université Libre de Bruxelles in Belgium and colleagues report online October 10 in Nature. Cells following this thyroid development program form hollow, hormone-producing spheres like those found in a normal thyroid gland. 10.11.12 | more >>

  • Rusty red stains on the head of a fossilized segmented creature found in southwestern China are a paleontological record-breaker: They are the remains of the oldest arthropod brain ever found. The imprint of the 520-million-year-old critter’s three-part brain indicates that complex nervous systems evolved fairly early in animal evolution, among the ancestors of insects, centipedes and crustaceans. 10.10.12 | more >>

  • As detective stories go, the Mystery of the Missing Xenon may not have the catchiest title. But scientists in Germany say they might have cracked this long-standing enigma. 10.10.12 | more >>

  • Robert Lefkowitz of Duke University in Durham, N.C., and Brian Kobilka of Stanford University will share the 2012 Nobel Prize in chemistry for work on molecules that help cells communicate with the outside world. 10.10.12 | more >>

  • Evil geniuses, commence drooling. Scientists have figured out how to remotely control a cell’s self-destruction. Magnets that guide the behavior of tiny metal beads can be used to flip on a cell’s death switch, kick-starting the cell’s demolition. The approach might one day be used to kill cancer cells or orchestrate other cellular events without drugs or incisions. 10.09.12 | more >>

  • A dollop of living yellow ooze has aced a test of navigation, showing that you don’t really need a mind to make spatial memories. 10.09.12 | more >>

  • Two scientists have won the 2012 Nobel Prize in physics for their pioneering work in quantum optics, a field that manipulates light and matter to measure very precise properties of single particles. 10.09.12 | more >>

  • For pregnant women, diets rich in fish can offer their babies protection against  developing behaviors associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, a new study finds. Yet for most Americans, fish consumption is the leading source of exposure to mercury — a potent neurotoxic pollutant that has been linked to a host of health problems, including delays in neural development. 10.08.12 | more >>

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