“I Will Be a Second Mohammed” – Mormon Founder, Joseph Smith

From left to right: Joseph Smith, Buddha, Jesus, and Mohammed

Hitchens on Mormons Part 1 of 2

Truth is my god. The only path to truth is evidence (convincing and sufficient evidence). Faith is not a path to truth as people have demonstrated by having had faith in many fraudulent persons and schemes throughout history. Divine revelation is not a path to truth as is proven by the incompatible revelations found in today’s competing human religions – they simply cannot all be true. Indeed the only real path to truth ever known to humanity is sufficient and convincing evidence.

Hitchens on Mormons Part 2 of 2

From the chapter entitled ‘Lowly Stamp of Their Origin — Religion’s Corrupt Beginnings’ of his book God is Not Great, Hitchens explains the origins of the Smith Cult.

“I Will Be a Second Mohammed” – Mormon Founder, Joseph Smith

 In the heat of the Missouri “Mormon War” of 1838, Joseph Smith made the following claim, “I will be to this generation a second Mohammed” “So shall it eventually be with us—‘Joseph Smith or the Sword!’ ”[1]

[1] Joseph Smith made this statement at the conclusion of a speech in the public square at Far West, Missouri on October 14, 1838. This particular quote is documented in Fawn M. Brodie, No Man Knows My History, second edition, (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1971), p. 230–231. Fawn Brodie’s footnote regarding this speech contains valuable information, and follows. “Except where noted, all the details of this chapter [16] are taken from the History of the [Mormon] Church. This speech, however, was not recorded there, and the report given here is based upon the accounts of seven men. See the affidavits of T.B. Marsh, Orson Hyde, George M. Hinkle, John Corrill, W.W. Phelps, Samson Avard, and Reed Peck in Correspondence, Orders, etc., pp. 57–9, 97–129. The Marsh and Hyde account, which was made on October 24, is particularly important. Part of it was reproduced in History of the [Mormon] Church, Vol. III, p. 167. See also the Peck manuscript, p. 80. Joseph himself barely mentioned the speech in his history; see Vol. III, p. 162.”

Similarities between Muslims and Mormons

Thomas S. Monson, the current “Prophet” of the LDS Church

Other similarities between Islam and Mormonism include, but are not limited to:

  • A founding prophet who received visits from an angel, leading to revelation of a book of scripture;
  • An emphasis upon family, and the family unit as the foundation for religious life and the transmission of values;
  • Insistence that their religion is a complete way of life, meant to directly influence every facet of existence;
  • A belief that theirs constitutes the one and only completely true religion on the earth today;
  • Belief that good deeds are required for salvation just as much as faith;
  • Assertions that modern Christianity does not conform to the original religion taught by Jesus Christ;
  • Belief that the text of the Bible, as presently constituted, has been adulterated from its original form;
  • Rejection of the Christian doctrines of Original Sin and the Trinity;
  • Strong emphasis upon education, both in the secular and religious arenas;
  • Belief in fasting during specified periods of time;
  • Incorporation of a sacred ritual of ablution, though each religion’s rite differs in form, frequency and purpose;
  • Belief that their faith represents the genuine, original religion of Adam, and of all true prophets thereafter;
  • Prohibition of alcoholic beverages, gambling, and homosexual and bisexual practices;
  • Belief that one’s marriage can potentially continue into the next life, if one is faithful to the religion;
  • Belief in varying degrees of reward and punishment in the hereafter, depending upon one’s performance in this life;
  • Special reverence for, though not worship of, their founding prophet;
  • Emphasis upon charitable giving, and helping the downtrodden;
  • An active interest in proselytizing nonbelievers;
  • Strong emphasis upon chastity, including modesty in dress; and
  • A clergy drawn from the laity, without necessarily requiring collegiate or seminary training.
  • A division of the religion into a minimum of two parties after the death of the founding prophet, with one party claiming that leadership should continue through the prophet’s descendents, and the other party rejecting this idea
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